Powerful accessories: door-knocker hoops

While I was visiting London, I decided to buy a pair of door-knocker hoops after seeing them worn by popular singer Rihanna. They are the classic bamboo door-knocker earrings made of silver. Little did I know about this accessory, and in particular about the meaning it had among black and brown communities. After listening to the video “Conversation with artist Amanda Lopez and Designer Tanya Melendez on Door-Knocker Hoops”, on coursera.org,  I understood the importance of this accessory. It is interesting how a small piece can be so powerful by coming to symbolise a sign of appropriation and resistance. A resistance by black and brown communities who want to make themselves heard by rejecting mainstream Western culture and stereotypical ideas on what kind of accessory it is better to wear. This is particularly true if we think that they were also worn as a sign of protest for the Black Power Movement. Hence, these hoops become a reinstatement of black and brown identities, and an effective example of appropriation of an object through which people can fully represent their own culture. I personally thought that wearing hoops was just a fad (a short-lived trend in fashion) introduced by pop and hip-hop culture, but now I look at them as a symbol of a community that wants to be heard by emphasising its own cultural background.

Some examples of door-knocker hoops for Balmain RTW 2014 Collection:

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Balmain, Fall 2014 Ready-to-Wear Collection via GettyImages

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Balmain, Fall 2014 Ready-to-Wear Collection via GettyImages

Embed from Getty Images

Balmain, Fall 2014 Ready-to-Wear Collection via GettyImages

Embed from Getty Images

Balmain, Fall 2014 Ready-to-Wear Collection via GettyImages

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